Progress Noted on 540-hp Engine Prototype

Energy-, environment-efficient engine seen applicable in U.S. and abroad

January 2, 2006 — Alpha Engines Corp., a company that has patented a "detonation cycle gas turbine engine" design, together with Turbine Truck Engines Inc., reports progress in manufacturing a 540-hp prototype. CostCast Inc., an aluminum casting operation in Haines City, FL, is producing the prototype, and Alpha and TTE recently observed the progress on the program.

Turbine Truck Engines is developing the energy- and environmentally efficient truck engine for mass-market use in the U.S. and abroad. It reports the engine can operate with "any known fuel source (gasoline, diesel, propane, natural gas, hydrogen, methanol, ethanol or LPG) or fuel mixture, yet needs zero coolant, lube oil, filters, or pumps." The lightweight turbine design has few moving parts, which reduces maintenance costs, and the "cyclic detonation process produces a complete combustion of fuel-oxidation mixtures, resulting in greater fuel economy and fewer harmful exhaust emissions."

TTE contracted Alpha to design, construct, and test the prototype.

"We are extremely pleased with the progress to date," reported CEO Michael Rouse of TTE, during recent vist to CostCast. "All component parts have been cast, including the detonation cylinders, housings, and turbines." Rouse was joined by Turbine Truck president Joseph Deters and Alpha Engines president Robert Scragg.

"Cost Cast possesses the ability and expertise to produce high-quality aluminum castings, resulting in an engine that is lighter and easier to manage," stated Scragg. "The completion of casting the DCGT component parts has enabled Alpha to begin assembling the engine in early January."

CostCast Inc. manufactures sand castings for aerospace, railroad, OEM, marine, laser-optic guidance system, construction, traffic control, and other specialized manufacturing applications.

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