Thresher Discussing Joint-Venture Manufacturing in Japan, South Korea

Not 'if,' states CEO, but 'where, whom'

Thresher Industries reports it has begun discussions with potential partners in Asia concerning a joint-venture manufacturing facility. The discussions are a byproduct of new business programs that have Thresher supplying nuclear shielding products to customers in Japan and South Korea.

Hanford, CA-based Thresher has begun supplying its Talbor material for to companies including Japan's Hitachi Zosen K.K., Metal One, Showa Co. Ltd., and Nippon Steel, and South Korea's Jinheung Corp. Discussions with these firms centered on establishing production capacity in the region, to supply a growing need for storing spent nuclear fuel rods.

Tom Flessner, Thresher president and CEO, stated, "With the growth we see in the nuclear industry in Asia, it is imperative that we place ourselves in a position to supply the demand for our material with a manufacturing facility in Asia. It is not of question of 'if' but a question of where and with whom we joint venture. We intend to have a signed memorandum of understanding with a potential partner almost immediately followed by a contract to joint venture to manufacture our Talbor material."

The company also recently announced its intention to set up a new manufacturing operation in Midwest, to serve customers in the Eastern U.S.

Thresher produces cast aluminum products and reinforced metal-matrix composite/aluminum alloy components, for customers with various applications. Its ThermaLite and TerraLite aluminum alloys are promoted for their wear resistance, thermal properties, and greatly increased strength.

Thresher also offers proprietary casting technologies, including the Nautilus core technology, which generates internal shapes and passages in castings without sand or binders normally used in casting operations, and is descibed as bio-degradable and recyclable.

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