Latest from Finishing

ABB Robotics
Messe Dusseldorf
Rösler Oberflächentechnik GmbH
Norton | Saint-Gobain
ATI Industrial Automation
The CGV-900 offers built-in compliance, allowing the unit to compensate for irregularities in part surfaces and maintain contact with a workpiece. The compliance force is adjustable, so users can fine-tune finishing processes in real time.
Dmitry Kalinovsky | Dreamstime
Plasma - or laser - cutting achieves clean cuts that require less grinding or deburring in subsequent finishing steps.
Image

OSHA Cites Columbus Castings for April Incident

Oct. 6, 2014
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued citations for two serious and two repeat violations in connection to an accident in April at Columbus Castings Co., an Ohio steel foundry.
Columbus Castings recently announced an expansion program to increase production volume, in response to growing demand for railcar parts. The steel foundry also plans to add new capability for sand recycling. According to local reports the expansion may result in up to 500 new employees at the plant.

The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued citations for two serious and two repeat violations in connection to an accident in April at Columbus Castings Co., an Ohio steel foundry. The agency is proposing penalties totaling total $89,500.

The company has not commented on the matter. OSHA provides companies 15 business days from receipt of citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with the OSHA area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

According to OSHA, on April 22 a Columbus Castings worker suffered a broken back, a collapsed lung and partial paralysis of his left leg after becoming pinned in a machine at the steel foundry there. As defined by OSHA, a “serious violation refers to a hazard, violation or condition that presents “a substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result.”

OSHA's interpretation of a “repeat” violation is one that is substantially similar to at least one prior violation by the same employer.

The agency reported Columbus Castings has been cited 11 times in the past 10 years for exposing workers to workplace hazards, including one incident in 2010 when an inspection discovered inadequate machine guards at the site. A similar citation in the recent event resulted in the “repeat violation.”

OSHA area director Deborah Zubaty stated: "This worker suffered life-altering injuries because Columbus Castings failed to implement basic safety procedures. Workers in this plant operate heavy industrial machinery that can produce castings weighing up to 70,000 pounds, and they deserve protection."

OSHA contends its investigation found that during maintenance on equipment hydraulics, Columbus Castings failed to lockout equipment used by the employee, which resulted in two serious safety violations.

About the Author

Robert Brooks | Content Director

Robert Brooks has been a business-to-business reporter, writer, editor, and columnist for more than 20 years, specializing in the primary metal and basic manufacturing industries. His work has covered a wide range of topics, including process technology, resource development, material selection, product design, workforce development, and industrial market strategies, among others. Currently, he specializes in subjects related to metal component and product design, development, and manufacturing — including castings, forgings, machined parts, and fabrications.

Brooks is a graduate of Kenyon College (B.A. English, Political Science) and Emory University (M.A. English.)